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jim beam double oak vs black

A long-time marketing professional and photographer, Pops hopes to use his professional experience and love of Bourbon to spread the Bourbon Gospel and help everyone realize the therapeutic power of having a good drink with friends. All rights reserved. We talk about bourbon, rye, or any American whiskey here (yes, even Jack). I am looking more for a smooth taste rather than sweet. They were kind enough to send us a sample, but life got in the way, and I’m just now getting around to sharing my review and thoughts of their recent release. In a word, yes. The Jim Beam Black in particular reminds me a lot of Knob Creek SmB; albeit a more tame and approachable version. So is it worth the price? But in real life bourbon is never that simple. Jim Beam White Label. But, sipped slowly, it is an enjoyable drink. https://www.bourbonbanter.com/author/patrick-pops-garrett/. Worth The Price: Suggested retail price is $22.99. A bit longer of a finish than the black, as the oak and spice linger. Neat, Splash or Rocks: At only 86 proof I drank this one neat and would recommend doing the same unless you’re going to use it in a mixed drink. If you’re a fan of Jim Beam Black, well…I leave the answer up to you. “I’m excited to experiment with the double barrel aging process used to create Jim Beam Double Oak,” said Fred Noe, 7th Generation Master Distiller, Jim Beam. Double Oak gets dumped into a new oak barrel for some additional aging measured in months vs. years as with Jim Beam Black. I am not sure if the lighter body is simply a matter of perception, where the heavier oak makes it simply seem lighter by comparison, or whether this is a case of Jim Beam trying to finish some of the more under active casks by giving them an oak topcoat. I would not suggest replacing that with this new release anytime soon. The Double Oak tasted very similar to the Black, but with the oak dialed up. We use cookies (soaked in whiskey) to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. Thank you. Finish: Finishes dry, dominated by the rye spices and oak. Here are a few details to kick things off from the formal product press release: Aged four years while sitting in freshly charred, new American oak barrels, Jim Beam Double Oak is then transferred to new, charred American oak barrels and aged to taste. Like the new Double Oak, Jim Beam Black shares the same mash bill as the original White Label, but it’s aged for almost twice as long giving it a more complex and well-rounded profile. Taste: Unsurprisingly, much more oak up front. This latest innovation from Jim Beam has a golden amber color and a distinctive spiced oakiness with intense caramel and toffee flavors. The Jim Beam Black in particular reminds me a lot of Knob Creek SmB; albeit a more tame and approachable version. Jim Beam Single Barrel. The evening was filled with some fantastic southern music, a great spread of food, cocktails incorporating the two whiskies of the night, and a great presentation from the Canadian brand ambassador for Jim Beam; Matt Jones. Kentucky Distilleries Map by Chuck Cowdery, Baltimore Spirits Company Celebrates Fifth Anniversary, Jim Rutledge Launches New 13 Year Old Bourbon, Wonderland Blend of Straight Whiskeys Review. Looks like you're using new Reddit on an old browser. This September they are going to be releasing a barrel-finished bourbon called Jim Beam Double Oak. Disclaimer: Jim Beam provided Bourbon & Banter with a sample of their product for this review. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. The Double Oak tasted very similar to the Black, but with the oak dialed up. This stuff is real nice. The exception being if you’re a big fan of Jim Beam Black. How I Drank It: Neat, in a Glencairn Whisky Glass. Double Oak’s aromas and flavors are brighter, more varied and as a result, more likely to appeal to those who favor lighter and more herbal bourbons. Like the new Double Oak, Jim Beam Black shares the same mash bill as the original White Label, but it’s aged for almost twice as long giving it a more complex and well-rounded profile. The login page will open in a new tab. Nice review, thanks. Vanilla, caramels, somewhat thinner in body compared to the black. We appreciate their willingness to allow us to review their products with no strings attached. Reminds me a lot of the nose on Knob Creek SmB, but maybe with the depth dialed slightly back. Nose: A bit brash, although whether from youth or heavy tannins I can't tell. Age: 4 years and then aged to taste in a 2nd brand new barrel. Oddly enough, the Double Oak seemed lighter in body to me though, which is the reason it ended up scoring slightly below the Black. To me, this tastes like the black, but with the spice and oak dialed up, but the depth of body dialed back.

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